Immorality of Youth Unemployment

60% of young people have no employment in Greece, 6 out of 10, 60 out of 100 young people have nothing useful in their lives. For most they are already condemned to a life unfulfilled, scraps of employment, acres of the dole, ill health, ambitions and self esteem shattered, lives wasted.

It is obscene, immoral. The politicians and bureaucrats of Athens, the EU, the IMF are inhuman, amoral not to do anything but exacerbate it. 

Even if they are devoid of humanity surely those in power must see the waste of economic resources. As these millions of unemployed people rise up the demographic tree they will be less able to contribute and be more of a drain on the European economies.

Corbyn and PMQs

Corbyn would be well advised to proceed with great caution if he is to succeed as Labour Party leader. He has according to the press not started too well so perhaps following on from my last post he might care to use these two questions to give David Cameron room to hang himself.

“Would the Prime Minister tell us what he said to the people / refugees / migrants he met on his recent visit to the camp in Lebanon?”

And to follow

“What did the people / refugees / migrants say in reply?”

In other words let Cameron do the talking.

Prime Minister’s Question Time

Jimmy Young on Radio 2 was a very gentle yet incisive interviewer. He was even known to get the better of Margaret Thatcher from time to time whereas Robin Day shouted and usually got nowhere.

Jeremy Corbyn should take note. David Cameron will try to bully him and shout him down with a  braying hoard of Tory MPs behind him. Quiet, gentle, seemingly innocuous questions seeking information not challenging might encourage him to commit indiscretions. Even if it does not achieve that, the contrast of shouty bully boy versus quiet reasonableness will be a subtle signal to voters.

As will better attendance in the House of Commons Chamber by his MPs. The image of SNP MPs massed in the Chamber with perhaps half a dozen members of other parties is doing them no end of good. There really is no good reason why the Labour and SNP opposition benches should not appear well filled for most important debates. Even occasional images of that sort on the news or other programmes will send a message to voters. It will not be so easy for Tory members to do the same thing. They have to fill the whole side of the chamber; a fair number are ministers and do have other commitments; the remainder may well be too used to the good life away from the House either in other jobs or at leisure to willingly sit in the Chamber. It is however what the electorate think they pay them to do.

Corbyn has won a notable victory against neoliberalism and if he can display sweet reasonableness in his public utterances he will be able to subtly demonstrate the differences between Labour and Tory ideology. Voters have shown that they will not elect a Tory Lite government when they can elect the real thing but there are probably enough to elect a distinct but moderate alternative able to convince them that austerity is not working.

Wow! Corbyn?

Wow! I really thought that Jermey Corbyn would not win the leadership of the Labour Party with the massed ranks of the neoliberal establishment massed against him. It appeared that the there would be some part of the party electoral system manipulated to stop him. It is a major defeat for the Neoliberal Right to let a left winger, however slight the actual shift to the left, take control of a major UK party.

It seems likely that we are living in an era of a possible tectonic shift in society, the huge flows of population in the Middle East and Africa and the growing realisation by voters in many European countries that governments of the Neoliberal right are exploiting them.

The USA and UK in particular did the equivalent of poking a hornets nest when they started to interfere in Afghanistan and the the Middle East. But the resultant firestorm was probably in the making anyway. The fundamentalist religious extremists have been able to spread their message throughout the region, along the North African coast and into many parts of sub Saharan African. The result is a tidewave of displaced people, refugees, pouring across borders to less unstable adjacent countries such as Lebanon and Jordan and then into Europe. There is no reason to believe that the EU can permanently stop the inflow. In the long run this is going to alter the structure of EU society. As I have said elsewhere, it is best for Europe to take advantage of an inflow of new and younger people to improve the demographic profile but also to realise that most of the refugees will be energetic and eager to work. Best to employ them to increase economic activity in the countries where they settle than to try to send them home. When and if their home countries stabilise, many are likely to return there having contibuted far more economically than they will have taken out in benefits. The UK government crows about the aid sent to the refugee camps in countries such as Jordan. That money is wasted, produces no economic return whereas those same refugees could be contributing to the UK economy.

Much more tentative but nevertheless beginning to blossom is the perceptible rise in populist parties in a  number of EU countries. I am hopeful that in spite of the hysterical and strident rearguard action by the Neoliberal elite this awakening will gather pace and eventually produce a real change for the better for the majority of EU citizens, a fairer more humane society allowing all the people to flourish and fulfill their potential.


It is perhaps not surprising given the power and reach of the Neoliberal uber-rich that in the UK, the EU and USA Austerity has become the orthodoxy.  In the UK it is taking on an extreme form in our political life.  So much so that the neoliberal Tories are regarded by many voters as a centre party. They have been bamboozled by the idea that the finances of a country are best managed like a household budget. Margaret Thatcher famously started the idea but George Osborne and Cameron are the real practitioners. Prof Steve Keen in an interview explains the absurdity of such theories. It is not surprising that his views and similar views of other serious economists are hidden under a blizzard of spin and invective by the powerful uber-rich who stand to lose if austerity is abandoned.

This has resulted in Labour becoming a right of centre party also enamoured of austerity which they dare not refute. That is the case with all their leadership nominees apart from Jeremy Corbyn. He is being taken apart by the neoliberal main stream media, not surprising in view of who owns them, and there is a desperate campaign to stop his bid for the labour Party leadership.

However, there are growing signs of at least some of the electorate realising the fact that they have been hoodwinked. Jeremy Corbyn is the popular candidate of the grassroots of the party, Greece elected a left wing party, Syriza, and there are movements in Spain and Italy.

Prof Steen mentioned the economic policy of the SNP in Scotland as going in the right direction.

Migrants are People too

The EU and particularly France and the UK have a refugee problem which is rapidly getting out of control. Let’s say that in Calais the French and UK police manage to stop any migrants getting near the Channel tunnel. This will lead to a steady build up of more and more people squatting in and around Calais. The flow of refugees from Africa and the Middle East is accessing the EU far away in the South so stopping the flow at Calais is not going to stop the EU ingress.

However doing nothing will only make the flow increase. Apparently millions of people around the world are on the move filling refugee camps in the Middle East and elsewhere. It is like an unstoppable force of nature. Maybe not stoppable but it can be better managed like the rechanneling of a river. Taking in refugees at one end, preparing them for another life elsewhere and then letting them move on.

I can only tentatively suggest that Europe has to create accommodation for refugees, work with their existing skills and add to them through education and training to make them citizens that other countries will wish to take on. For example the UK is importing huge numbers of nurses from countries which can ill afford to lose them. If the UK created a surplus of nurses through refugee training, those countries might not lose out so badly.

As it is the current UK and French policies are counterproductive, absorbing huge resources of money and manpower and not solving the problem.

Review of The Caveman Rules of Survival

The Caveman Rules of Survival by Dawn C Walton discusses the role that our subconscious plays in ordering and governing our lives.

Dawn herself is a business woman turned practising Cognitive Hypnotherapist so much of the book is based on her own experience of counselling. It is remarkably jargon free, giving straightforward simple explanations for what are complex psychological situations. She postulates the theory of three Caveman instincts which govern much of our non-conscious lives, the fight, flight or freeze condition, the need for parental love and the necessity to be part of a group. Childhood incidents add what she calls rules to each of these categories. The rules then keep the person safe by avoiding similar situations. For instance an embarrassing confrontation may lead to a person being a loner, not wanting to get into a similar situation which will cause embarrassment again.

This picture of our inner selves does set a scene which is readily understandable. The many examples in the book can no doubt be identified by many readers and the explanation is satisfyingly straight forward. Dawn then explains that by using hypnotherapy she can find the hidden childhood event and by suggesting a different interpretation of the scenario can rewrite the rule and thereby release her client from domination of the rule in adult life.

All this certainly hangs together and thus makes the book very readable and one that might help some people cope with some of the phobias and hang-ups which spoil their lives. Furthermore the book has received a commendation from Professor Trevor Harley, Chair of Cognitive Psychology at Dundee University. This adds a certain credibility to the book.